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Adi is a social business blogger and community manager that writes for sites such as Social Business News and Social Media Today. Away from the computer he enjoys cycling, particularly in the Alpes. Adi is a DZone Zone Leader and has posted 1115 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Charitable tipping

03.20.2014
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I don’t tip because society says I have to. All right, if someone deserves a tip, if they really put forth an effort, I’ll give them something a little something extra. But this tipping automatically, it’s for the birds. As far as I’m concerned, they’re just doing their job.

Few movies have enjoyed such a memorable opening scene as that delivered by Reservoir Dogs, as the main protagonists of the movie sit around the cafe table discussing their upcoming heist.  When it comes to tipping time, Mr Pink delivers his now famous exposition on why he doesn’t tip.

Maybe he’d be more inclined to do so if Mogl had been available back then.  Mogl is a startup that aims to take the humble tip and put it to use in reducing hunger.  The premise is a relatively simple one.  If diners use the app, it entitles them to a 10% discount on their meal.  They can then choose whether to keep that discount, or donate it to food backs and hunger charities.

This represents a slight shift from their original model, whereby any spend over $20 in an affiliated restaurant would automatically generate the donation of a meal to a food poverty charity.  Despite this model generating over 500,000 meals, the Mogl team felt that the new model will prove even more effective.

Users connect up their credit/debit cards to the app.  Each time they then use their cards at a restaurant teamed up with Mogl, they will be informed of the 10% discount, at which point they’re given the choice of having the money returned to their accounts or given to charity.  One meal is generated for every 20 cents donated, and users can track how many meals they’ve donated via the app, as well as competing with their friends.

The restaurants also benefit by greater diner engagement, with the hope that people will eat out more often, whilst of course they are also doing good by empowering the donations.  The app is currently available to download on both Apple and Android phones and is currently serving around 100 restaurants in the San Diego area.  Hopefully as the model proves successful it will begin to roll out in a much wider area.

Check out the Mogl video below for more information.



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